Missouri Governor Jay Nixon in Clarksville; Flood 2013

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Peak Water

After just 3 days filling sand bags and building the Main St levee, Clarksville has been fighting back peak water for 2 days straight. The rise stalled in the high 34’ level and everyone felt at ease.

But by Monday morning, the water had risen another 1/2’ to 35.35’. The stress on the Main St levee was still increasing, shaking some nerves. Both the North and South side of the Main St levee needed reinforcement. The AmeriCorps team battled the North side wall with sandbag reinforcement, while the National Guard took over the South side with massive loads of new fill.

By 3:00 PM, the reinforcements added enough stability to settle nerves again. Teams began to take breaks, eat for the first time that day, and the bag supply finally began to pile up again. (Inmates from local prisons helped replenish sand bags all afternoon.)

After things settled down, I grabbed homemade food from the Clarksville Methodist Church and finally made my way home.

Clarksville Preparing for Flood

To help: Check-in on Howard Street across from City Hall. They will direct you to where you will be the most help.

Clarksville has been preparing for another historic flood this week. Thank You to all the volunteers both local and non-local. With the help of over 100 people the downtown is preparing for 35+ foot water level, which would crest at the 4th highest level in the history of Clarksville flood recordings.

AmeriCorps has sent nearly 30 members or more into Clarksville. The young adults involved in AmeriCorps have worked non-stop to shovel every pile of sand into 1000s of sandbags. When I left town at 10:00 PM, they were still working alongside many locals with vested and sentimental interest in Clarksville, its history, businesses, and people.

Thank You Everyone.

I am using this site to gage the water level, prediction, and historical reference: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=lsx&gage=clkm7

Prediction

Duck and Geese Migrating through Pike & Lincoln County

Yesterday I noticed the skies were full of migrating snow geese. Today, I grabbed my camera and went to find them, as well as a few beautifully colored ducks passing through. See all the pictures and help identify everything!

I drove Missouri Highway 79 from Clarksville to Elsberry and found a few thousand snow geese in a field off 79 & Old Dameron Rd (gravel). I pulled in just before the noise of a nearby train flushed 1000 birds into the air. From the first frames I could tell it was going to be a good day for pictures.

I continued on Old Dameron and looped back around toward Elsberry where I got great close-ups of Mallard and Pintail. Then I headed north on Hwy 79 to Annada, Missouri and the Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge. I stopped at the visitor center to get the latest migratory info from the local rangers. Just by driving through the refuge, I was able to capture the great pictures of 100’s of ducks bursting from the managed fields. There were many different types of duck in the sky, and I even captured an eagle in their midst.

It was a great experience to see so many birds in the area. You can experience the same thing by making a day trip to your local wildlife refuge.

Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge
The 3,750-acre Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge is located in the floodplain of the Mississippi River, adjacent to Pool No. 25. The refuge’s diversity of habitats supports waterfowl, wading birds, shorebirds, and songbirds. Although it is protected by a levee, the refuge provides flood storage in periods of high water.

Clarence Cannon Refuge is managed by Great River National Wildlife Refuge.

Getting There . . .
From St. Louis, take I-70 west to the Highway 79 exit. Take Highway 79 north approximately 35 miles to the town of Annada. In Annada, take County Road 206 east one mile to the refuge office.